Military Working Dogs

Canine Companions Senior Leadership Attends Sergeant Rex Book Signing

I generally don’t talk much about military working dogs here, although I have occasionally, but I just read Sergeant Rex: The Unbreakable Bond Between a Marine and His Military Working Dog  a few weeks ago – super book, definitely recommend you read it.

I also discovered a little Canine Companions for Independence connection after I read the book that I want you to know about since you probably haven’t heard about it anywhere else.

Sergeant Rex: The Unbreakable Bond Between a Marine and His Military Working Dog
I found out last week that Corey Hudson, CCI CEO, and Paul Mundell, National Director of Canine Programs (who has also … Read More

Don’t Try This At Home

I see a lotta working dog pictures, but this is a first (at least for me), so thought I’d post it here for a little change of pace.

Just saw it on Twitter from the Australia Defence Force: “Defence photo of the day. A Royal Australian Air Force Military Working Dog jumps through a ring of fire at Australia Defence Force Academy Open Day.” (Click the photo for a much larger image.)

And if you don’t like it or think it’s cruel, contact the ADF, not me, OK?  I think it’s really something else.… Read More

Labrador Retrievers In Combat As IED Detector Dogs

One of the best Military Working Dog articles I’ve seen is in the Marine Corps Times today, and this one’s about a very specific subset of MWDs – Labrador Retrievers who are trained to work off leash as Improvised Explosive Device Detector Dogs.

Marines train at the K2 facilities near Marston, N.C., to use bomb sniffing dogs. The dogs work off the leash and will be assigned to the same Marine for the whole deployment to Afghanistan.

“Dogs becoming essential in fight against IEDs”

Doesn’t pull any punches in describing how dangerous a job this is or how tough life can be for these dogs, but also gives you a real look at how much their handlers love the dogs and the relationship they have.

I know there are … Read More

OK, So All Cats Aren’t Worthless – Even Military Working Dogs Like This One

Max, a 21-pound (!) tabby at the Luke Air Force Base clinic in Phoenix, is so cool even the military working dogs like him.

Max, a 21-pound gray tabby cat, and Kisma, 56th Security Forces military working dog, greet each other at the Luke Air Force Base Veterinary Clinic in Glendale, Ariz.
Max, a 21-pound gray tabby cat, and Kisma, 56th Security Forces military working dog, greet each other at the Luke Air Force Base Veterinary Clinic in Glendale, Ariz. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo – click for larger).

‘Clinic cat on orders to Luke’

I hafta be honest, though, and say it is a little disappointing a vet clinic would let a cat get that heavy.  Plus this story was originally run … Read More

Military Working Dog Makes Historic Tandem Parachute Jump

I saw a brief newspaper article about this jump a few weeks ago with a small picture and figured it was just a matter of time before we’d see the usual hi-res official Army photos.  Well, sure enough, they’re out (click on them for the giant versions):

U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Chris Lalonde, center, holds his military working dog, Sgt. Maj. Fosco, and jumpmaster Kirby Rodriguez behind them, as they free fall through the air making history with the military’s first tandem airborne jump from an altitude of 12,500 feet on Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Sept. 18, 2009. Lalonde is assigned to Company D, 701st Military Police Battalion, and Rodriguez is assigned to the 342nd Training Squadron. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Vince Vander Maarel

U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Chris Lalonde, center, holds his military working dog, Sgt. Maj. Fosco, and jumpmaster Kirby Rodriguez behind them, as they free fall through the air making history with the military’s first tandem airborne jump from an altitude of 12,500 feet on Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Read More